What we do

Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. An estimated 74% of the population lives below 1.25$ a day, maternal mortality remains high. Statistics suggest that 10 women unnecessarily die each day through childbirth contributing to the shocking statistic that there are 1,000,000 orphans in Malawi.
And that is why Open Arms exists.
Open Arms returns, supports and monitors immunised and fit toddlers to their relatives when we can, and give children the chance to grow up within a loving family environment and the security of a home.

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Where we help

  From newborn to 2 years old, babies receive complete care in our Blantyre and Mangochi Homes. Babies arrive at Open Arms through the hospitals and the Social Welfare Department and are often in desperate need of help. Once at Open Arms they will receive the medical care, shelter and nourishment, that their extended family…

Blantyre

Blantyre

Mangochi

Mangochi

At Open Arms our main aim is to return a healthy and fit toddler back to his or her home community. Sadly, however, this is not always possible. In some situations, such as intense poverty within the home community, further deaths of relatives, or simply that a child has no extended family to return to,…

Harrogate House

Harrogate House

The third phase of care that we can provide with your help is our foster house programme. Our foster houses are situated within medium density areas of Blantyre City. The houses, owned by Open Arms, are clustered reasonably near to each other and are staffed by a House Mother and Assistant House Mother appointed from…

Roses House

Roses House

Richmond House

Richmond House

Tsekwe House

Tsekwe House

Rosemarie’s House

Rosemarie’s House

Annie’s House

Annie’s House

Our main aim is to return a two year old to his or her home community healthy, strong and immunised. When a child returns home they will be looked after by their extended family, usually an aunt or grandmother. There are situations where a grandmother might be looking after eight of her orphaned grandchildren already,…

Feeding Stations and Nursery Schools

Feeding Stations and Nursery Schools

Community Outreach

Community Outreach

Cash Transfer Scheme

Cash Transfer Scheme

Support from 15 year old Cameron allows Boyce to return to the heart of his family

Support from 15 year old Cameron allows Boyce to return to the heart of his family

Boyce came to Open Arms in November 2011. He arrived at just 6 months old and had lost his mother, contacted chicken pox and was only a gram or two above his birth weight. His father, who lived in a rural village 60km from Blantyre, sought help because he, like many other subsistence farming families, was struggling to cope financially and had three older children to care for.

School visitors make a lasting impression

School visitors make a lasting impression

Each year we very much look forward to the scheduled visits from our partner schools, as the students, without exception, arrive overflowing with enthusiasm, energy, compassion and a real desire to learn and make a difference to the lives of all those connected with Open Arms. This year we were once again taken aback by the sheer determination, positivity and spirit of the young people who came, and their endeavours have left a tangible and lasting impression on all those who spent time with them.

She may be a twin but she’s one of a kind!

She may be a twin but she’s one of a kind!

Prisca was orphaned shortly after turning one when her mother died from an illness. Both Prisca and her twin sister Francisca were moved to be with their aunt. Overwhelmed, exhausted and barely coping as it was, their aunt already had 13 children to look after, so two more little ones to feed and care for unfortunately proved to be too much.

Charlie Dawson leaves a lasting impression

Charlie Dawson leaves a lasting impression

The babies, toddlers and the foster children all so enjoyed Charlie’s friendly nature, as he rolled up his sleeves and got stuck into all the day-to-day activities; from feeding tiny babies their porridge to playing games with toddlers; and from to tutoring the older children in maths to sorting out and organising the cupboards.